Pattern Shift

#61 - “Our podcast evolution: How Zoe and Saskia support their business and listeners + BIG NEWS”

May 12, 2023 Zoe Edwards Season 3 Episode 61
Pattern Shift
#61 - “Our podcast evolution: How Zoe and Saskia support their business and listeners + BIG NEWS”
Pattern Shift + PS
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Show Notes Transcript

In this episode, podcast hosts Zoe Edwards of Check Your Thread and myself discuss how we approach our podcasts and how we make it work for our businesses. We talk about how we’ve shifted our focus over time and how our podcasts have evolved along with our businesses. We also discuss advertising and how it may or may not fit into our podcast and business models. And… there’s a big change a-commin’. I will reveal all in this episode.

FULL SHOW NOTES WITH TAKEAWAYS

https://www.asmallerlife.com/61

BEST QUOTES FROM THE EPISODE

  • “I love that usually you're in somebody's ears or you are with somebody and there's not a lot of other people around. So it's really personal.” - Saskia
  • “I feel that would not be a good fit for my podcast. I feel that a lot of what I say is, maybe we don't need to buy so much stuff or we need to be more selective.” - Zoe
  • “You can go in all guns blazing and it's just one thing and then life happens and shifts happen.” - Zoe
  • "It's always going to be a podcast as the focus, but I'm excited to add other elements." - Zoe
  • "It's a balance between being authentic and also being able to support yourself." - Saskia

LINKS

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CONNECT WITH ZOE

www.checkyourthread.com

CONNECT WITH SASKIA @ A SMALLER LIFE + JA, WOL

website www.asmallerlife.com community https://community.ja-wol.come-mail info@ja-wol.com

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Saskia:

A few weeks ago at Easter, my friend, Sophie Edwards and her family visited my house. And we met for the first time in real life as a returning friend of the podcast. So he has been on a smaller life a couple of times to talk about sewing and sustainability within sewing. And this time we are taking it one level up talking about our podcast in itself.

For those of you who don't know. Zoey hosts the podcast, check your threads. And is the initiator behind the hashtag MI made may. So even I have different views on how we produce our podcast. And how we look at advertising. It's going to be a little peek behind the curtains of how we do things. And I think it could be interesting for you to learn as a business owner and as a maker, what it's like to produce a podcast. So he has been making her podcast for about as long as I have. She's doing weekly shows. I'm doing bi-weekly shows. We are now looking back on what we've been making. And how we want to add or change things. To serve our listeners even better. So we'll share a little bit about that too.

Saskia:

In this 20 minute episodes, you will hear about our different takes on running and hosting a podcast. We had an amazing time and I can't wait for us to start moving into all the new things we have planned for the future of our podcast. If you liked what you heard, if you have any thoughts, questions, ideas, we would so love it. If you share that with us. So please go to a smaller life.com. Find the episode. Uh, show notes there's a tab on the right where you can leave us a voice note. Oh, you can simply send an email to info@jhyphenwol.com. That's info at yeah. Hyphen volt.com. Have fun. Right Zoe, welcome

Zoe:

to my play room. I'm in your playroom in your city. Yes. In your country. And we can actually hug. I don't,

Saskia:

weird. It is very weird and very fun.

Zoe:

I know this. So we've known each other for can year. We are you I feel like about a year. Oh shit. Look it up. Yeah. Then we can have a, a

Saskia:

party when it's a year or 12 and a half. You can,

Zoe:

yeah. Yeah. This is amazing. It's like, I mean, I'm used to seeing these pictures on Zoom. Yeah.

Saskia:

Can you even make out what it is on Zoom? Yes. Oh, that's good. That's good to know. Yes. Yeah. Let

Zoe:

no, I'd know Charles,

Saskia:

anything that the sheep speaks for itself. Yeah. Is the sheep newer? It is newer. Absolutely. Yes. And I'm trying to, I had the Edinburg Festival up there as well. That's about, yeah. A little weaving

Zoe:

as well. But I like the sheep. Yeah, I love it. So this is where the magic happens. This It is. This is where you make your podcast.

Saskia:

Yes. This is where I sew. This is everything. This is the guest room. This is my spot. Yeah.

Zoe:

Yeah. So talking of Paul Carlos. So podcast is, it's, it's in flux at the moment, isn't it? It's exciting times

Saskia:

for your podcast. It is exciting times because I am, uh, in my third season now. Right.

Zoe:

And then tell me about your whole season thing. Okay, yeah, let's do that. So, is that a year? Um,

Saskia:

yes. It's a year. I, I basically always take a break over the summer. Mm-hmm. Um, and I try to work up to this moment where I. Kind of bulk record, bulk added before I go on a break. Yeah. And what I've done before is do shorty episodes. So I'll have really short episodes answering short questions or just thoughts or ideas so that people in the summer have something to listen to. So it's not completely quiet, but I can take a full break. Yeah. And I really enjoy that. I take that time to, to. Basically not think about it. You would say you take that time to think about the podcast and where to go, but I take it to take a break. Yeah. And then when I go back, the ideas come by themselves usually. Yeah. Uh, but now it's a little bit different because. I've been in pondering and thinking about doing things a little bit differently. Yeah. So when I started the podcast, it was going to be about, it's called a Smaller Life. I, at the time, I was pivoting my business and I was kind of finding my way into this idea that I have, uh, like a vision, a thing, uh, that I wanted to create, but I wasn't sure yet how to do it, where to go. And I knew that I feel good, comfortable, and happy amongst crafters, needle crafters, but also specifically, uh, business owners in the field. And I really, really love, uh, mentoring, helping and giving out tips, all those kinds of things. So the podcast was a mixture of the, the makers and the sellers. Mm-hmm. And talking about, uh, one part about making your own, uh, garments. And the other part was looking at the backside of. Um, the businesses that make that happen. Um, and I slowly but sadly kind of, uh, polished the idea and polished what my actual mission was going to be. And, um, the podcast has turned more into, uh, a business focused podcast that crafters love to listen to because then they again, Hear about their favorite, uh, businesses and how they do their thing. Yeah, because I think, I'm not sure how it is in sewing, but, um, a lot of crafters dream about starting a business in their craft. Not everybody, but there's a, a whole bunch of people. I wish I had a yard shop. Yeah. I wish I was a. Uh, and so the podcast was for both those audiences, but now I think I could do a better job helping the businesses if I have a little bit more focus on the businesses. So that's kind of where, yeah, I'm

Zoe:

going. I can say easy that because people will still listen if they're interested. Yes. But if you really focus on that core audience, then you can really serve them. To the best of your ability, and it's just fascinating. Yeah, absolutely. From, from the kind of as you say, from, yeah. Like if you're talking to big name, you know, from the fan perspective. Yeah. Or yeah, like a sneaky peek behind the curtain, as you say. That's really fascinating.

Saskia:

Yeah, yeah, yeah. So the results, it's not going to be all that different. It's more the way that I kind of fly into it, like, Sean, what's, what are the questions I need answering when I talk to somebody? And what are the. The issues that small business owners in the field struggle with most. And, uh, it's not, it's not going to be as much about the whole journey that, uh, a business owner has gone through before they ca, before they ended up where they are. Wh which is what you usually hear in an interview with a name or a, a brand. I want Yeah. I want to go more into, uh, how do you deal with. Uh, difficult customers or something like

Zoe:

that. So might focus on a specific topic and find people that can address that topic. Exactly. Yeah. Exactly. Yeah. Yeah. Because sometimes when you're speaking to somebody and you start with the, oh, so how did you get into whatever? And what was your backstory? And yeah. And that's fascinating, but it doesn't always help necessarily. And sometimes you can end up, the conversation can kind of float around and. And that's fine, but it's not necessarily the most helpful thing. Exactly.

Saskia:

And I think he helpful is the word here. Um, I just told you that my, my, my game, my goal, it feels like a game sometimes. My goal is that people are listening and they, they have their own business and they, they're thinking, okay, I need to copy these show loads. I need to put them in a folder and I need to get to work. That's the kind of vibe I'm going for. Yeah. And also answering your first question. Uh, I do this biweekly. Mm-hmm. Uh, so that I have enough type in between to focus on the other group, uh, the makers and the I'll, I'll communicate with them on the, um, the YE community and through our email list, so they will still get enough attention. Sure. But, and however I do this, Biweekly by choice. But you bring out a podcast every

Zoe:

single week? Yes. Why? How, tell me more. Tell me. More's a It's a really good question. I think, um, when I started getting into listening to podcasts, all the podcasts that I was listening to were weekly, so I guess I just kind of assumed that that's not all of them. That's, that's usual. But most of them were weekly and I. And I kind of like that momentum. Mm-hmm. And like that energy, I didn't realize it was gonna be as hard. I so much hardcore, I didn't realize Yeah. Going into it. Yeah. That it was gonna be as intense as it is, especially to create something that is. To the best of my ability. Many's not obviously the most polished, cold in the world, but it's the best that I can. That would be boring. Nigo. Well, this is the thing that you listen to those podcasts that are really slick, and then you hear the thank yous at the end and the list of people that are the, the sound editors. The, the, the fact checkers than this. Yeah. But that the whatever, and it's just me and Pat helps me then put it into the world. Yeah. And so, you know, we can only do what we can do. Yeah. So, yeah, so I'm covering away, um, and I don't do seasons either. I just, just keep going. I am taking two weeks off to be here. Yeah. Which is uh, which is a treat. Yes. And I think that that's for me, how I'm gonna create the balance is that when my kids are on a break mm-hmm. I'd be probably not, if it's a half terminal, it's just a week off, but when they're, they're off for more than a week to take a bit of time off. So take a couple of weeks off at Christmas, take a couple of weeks off at Easter. Definitely. And take a bit of time off in the summer, because otherwise, It's not gonna be sustainable. No,

Saskia:

absolutely not. And you still have to kind of plan to be able to do that. Absolutely. It's, it's going to get a little bit more work before you can take the actual break. Yeah,

Zoe:

yeah. Yeah. It's funny. Yeah. So that's what I'm thinking of doing. And there was one time when I, I. Because I did do a year, no gap of time. Oh my gosh. And over that Christmas, and even when I went to stay with my in-laws at the C, the Christmas, I was still trying to edit and stuff like that. Mm-hmm. And I remember I got a comment from somebody going, well, I really appreciated that you put out an episode over Christmas that I had something to listen to. Was great. Good. Yeah.

Saskia:

Was that

Zoe:

killed me. People happy. Yeah. But then

Saskia:

was really curious. Um, Are you afraid that if you take a break, people won't come back? That's what, what's the emotions around it? Do you, what do you feel around that? I don't,

Zoe:

so I don't think so. If you look

Saskia:

at yourself and how you listen to podcasts.

Zoe:

Yeah, I think there is. Um, I'm, I don't, I'm not scared of taking a break. I'm scared of taking a break, but it it not be apparent because then people might be like, Where am I back and say, look, I'm taking two weeks off. This is the reason why I'll be back. Yeah. Um, I think that's fine. Yeah. Are you? Yeah,

Saskia:

absolutely. And I think, um, I never want to be in a position where my followers, clients, listeners think that I am subhuman. So I always. That would be hard for me to do my work if, uh, I have to be able to tell myself that there's room and space for me to be human and to be sick or just to not be there for a while. And I try to look at myself and how I react to, to similar situations. And. Um, it's really funny because we both have, uh, a podcast that we like listening to about podcast. About podcast. Very metal. And, uh, they've been rerunning shows for a couple of weeks, you said? Yeah, I

Zoe:

think it's about four in a row now. Yeah.

Saskia:

And we are here, we're here thinking, okay, what's going on? What's going on? So indeed, because there wasn't an

Zoe:

announcement, right? It's, it's regular that now and again, they do replay a previous episode. Yes. So that was fine. But now it's just week four. Now are we getting worried? What's

Saskia:

going on? What's going on? This person's sick. Is it like we worried we're fans. We're we're actually, we worried. But it's also a little bit of, uh, went to a what you said, when do I get my next fixed? Yeah. I need my next. So I think one of. I think what's important when you, when you plan these things and when you make decisions around planning your podcast, that you communicate to your audience and you have quite a big following on Patreon. I'm super jealous. Every single time I talk to Zoe, I'm like, How do you I have like, I have like eight people. Thank you. Eight people by the way. Thank you. Thank you so much. Um, but y I mean you're doing great with that, but that's an whole different topic anyways. You, you can communicate quite directly to them. Yeah, I do that via my email list, which is actually almost the size of your Patreon amount. People that are specifically asking for news about the podcast. Yeah. Did just not pay me. Sorry, couldn't, couldn't help myself. I'll cut this out maybe, or maybe not. Um, but then we can communicate directly to our followers and saying, Hey, you know what guys? I'm going on a break. And in your case, you directly said, I think you

Zoe:

said you were going to do, I said it in the episode after I also sent a message to, yeah, that makes it truth. Well, you know all people not to worry about

Saskia:

me. Yeah. Well, not to worry or not to be frustrated that there's your thing. I mean, you

Zoe:

can listen to any episodes that you think out.

Saskia:

Exactly. And especially when you, and that brings me up to the next question. When you come out with an episode every week. Yeah, we, we know that people that listen to podcasts are people that listening to podcasts. Yeah. It is rare. Hard to pronounce. It's rare that you just listened to what podcasts, apart from my mom. Oh, apart for your mom,

Zoe:

she's now listening to Upon politics all as well. She should listen to more.

Saskia:

No, but it you usually, you listen to a couple, right? Absolutely. So there's never going to be a moment that there's nothing

Zoe:

out there. Absolutely. And if there, if, I think if you are, and it comes back round to what you were saying about refocusing your podcast on a specific audience. Yeah. When you are speaking to someone, when somebody's like, this podcast is for me, I think then I don't think you need to fear that they'll wander off. No. Because they're like, oh, I love, they're waiting for the next to me. Yes. You know, like, yeah. They might go and listen to something else. I mean, everyone is a multifaceted person. Everyone's gonna be interested in like, Entertainment stuff or some commit comedy stuff, or the cooking podcast, or a politics podcast or a music podcast, and everyone has different facets of their life, but when they are tapping into what you do, you are speaking to them and no one can do it in quite the way that you can do it. No, that's similar. Yeah, but, and I think that's really powerful and I think that that's, yeah, that's one of the reasons why I think, oh no, because like I've worked hard to, to make this for a particular person. Like I have it in my head who they are. Yeah. So this is a Christian. Then do you have in, oh sorry. So has it changed if you have one in your mind, a person that you make your podcast for? Have like an avatar or a persona or something? Yes, I

Saskia:

do. No, I don't.

Zoe:

It's kinda great. Great house. Thank you.

Saskia:

No, I think that the person in my mind is, um, morphing from, and this will sound ridiculous, but for a short amount of time I did breading for an interior designing shop. Mm-hmm. And I. Showed them and taught them how to connect to their customer better in finding who that person is. So, uh, for fun, I looked up a couple of, uh, portrait pictures, uh, online using unsplash.com and that's why you can use, uh, stop photos for free and, uh, without getting in trouble. And, uh, we had all these ladies that were their customer. And when I was doing that, I was looking at all the portraits and like, oh wait, this is body custom part. Oh. So I have a couple of those pictures from one splash that I really connect to, but also I have the people in my business circle, like literal, actual people. Sure. Um, and they are the people. Yes. This is who I'm talking to. So it kind of morphs from one, one of them into one of the pictures and then back and the. Um, yeah, I'm trying to, to keep them in mind and talk to them and I always, what I love about POTS podcasting, apart from the fact that I don't have to do my makeup every single time, um, I love that usually you're in somebody's ears or. You're with somebody and there's not a lot of other people around, so it's really personal. Mm-hmm. And in the beginning I talked to plural, you all, but now I try to talk to the white person because I do feel like it's a really personal connection. And, and, uh, yeah, I'd love to, to to just connect to the right people, hopefully, uh, with doing a little bit of a, a shift. Yeah.

Zoe:

So what a pattern shift maybe. Yeah. Well let's get the say so. So the patent, so the re reconfiguring, yeah, let's let, let's call it

Saskia:

refi configuring, but, but it's

Zoe:

not a, it's not a wipe. The say clean start again. Is it? It's no. Quite, yeah.

Saskia:

Shift of it's has called like a pattern shift. Yeah. Yeah. And um, I think that's really important because if I pay too much attention and say, Uh, rebranding all the time, cuz today I actually made a questionnaire for, uh, for all of you who are listening for you alone, the one person that's listening now. Um, and I was typing in the text and thinking, talking about the rebranding, and I thought, no, no, because. If I'll talk about it that way, I might, um, push away the crafters who are still very, very

Zoe:

well, we're not evenk. Yeah. Yeah. Slightly evolving. Yeah. That's it. I

Saskia:

think that's it. It's an evolution. And also professionalizing that word. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Because I'm also looking into the, uh, also with the editing. And the sound is probably gonna be a little bit different. The podcast arts will be a little bit different. Mm-hmm. But not like completely, it's not climate recognizer. No, absolutely not. So don't worry about it. And you people that are, uh, listening and, and, uh, subscribe, they will, they don't have to do anything. It will just drop, um, uh, most probably with, uh, a different name because I think a smaller, like is not. Uh, is too wide. If somebody is looking for a specific podcast or creative business or supports that in our, then they won't find it. But if they, if they find, yeah, it should be a better name. So I have some ideas. Exciting. Yeah.

Zoe:

I cannot wait to see how it evolves.

Saskia:

Yes. So do you have any ideas with future evolving or uh,

Zoe:

Well, so check your thread was always, I mean obviously it's podcast first, but I always thought that maybe there'll be other elements. So I deliberately got like, check your threads.com. Yeah, it's app. Check your thread on Instagram. It's not Check your thread podcast or press card or dot portal. So I'm open and I think if anything, I've learned that. You can go in all Gods amazing and it's just one thing and then life happens and, and shifts happen. So I'm looking forward to adding some other elements. It's always gonna be yeah, podcast as as the focus. But I'm excited to add other elements. I think that there's different ways just as people learn differently and um, I think that people like to engage with their passion Yeah. In multiple different ways. And I love that the podcast, as you were saying, it's such an intimate thing and you can be in someone's ear and they can be. They can be literally nesting whilst they sew. Mm-hmm. Or just obviously a lovely pair. Love though. But also what I really like about podcast is it allows you to engage with a topic when you can't actually be doing the thing. Yes. You know, like you are on the train or you are Yeah. Washing up or you, you're under sleeping baby or whatever it is and you can't do the thing. Yeah. Yeah. So enough the idea that people can. Or, you know, or they're ill or they're sick, or, you know, something like that, that they can be engaging with sewing, they can be engaging with ideas of sustainability, um, and it can be fueling them and inspiring them, and we can have that connection when they can't do something else. So I really like that as well. But I'm, yeah, I'm looking to create some additional resources, um, to put out there for, for people that like to absorb things in, in different ways

Saskia:

we have talked about this before and I think, uh, I, I like to talk about it now for a second Co. Couple of minutes maybe. Um, how do you feel about advertising?

Zoe:

I feel that would not be a good fit for my podcast. I feel that a lot of what I say is, Maybe we don't need to buy so much stuff, or we need to be more selective. Mm-hmm. And I feel that there would be, for what, I think it might be a bit disingenuous to then be like, oh, have you heard about this? Yes. The thread company. Yeah. Or something like that. And also I feel like for myself, Rocky, if I knew that I was taking money from a company, I would feel comfort beholden to a certain extent, but in a way that then there we. Would be a client of mine. Yeah. And I wouldn't feel as free to to really say what I feel. Yeah. And I don't wanna be compromised in that way. Yeah. For me, it's not a good fit. But yeah, I'm kind of coming at things from a different hoggle and I think in, in an interesting way, that's kind of something that we have that's different in terms of the pat thing, because I am kind of like, I'm kind of, there's not much differentiation between myself and the listener. You know, like I am a soa. Yeah. You know? Yeah. And I'm like under the, maybe I, I get to do it. I don't even know that I get to do it necessarily more than some other people, but I'm very much of a company is a similar status. Right. Yeah. Whereas, um, I dunno, when things are a bit more business. There's a bit more of a business aspect. I think maybe things like, cuz you are an expert, all of these different spheres, whereas I am more finding experts. Yeah. What we walk to. So it's, it's, it's a different kind of, I, I keep coming back to word status cause I can't think of a difference. Yeah.

Saskia:

No, but I know you mean, and I think in advertising it's just, Maybe the word is monetizing your podcast. It's even more like that because I've been thinking about it a lot too. Mm-hmm. This morning I did it. I, I do this a lot, but I try to look at my current situation and roughly just really roughly one episode costs about up to 10 hours to produce. Right. Everything around it. So more than a day and it costs up to. Hundred Euros with all the costs that I have, and they're talking about, uh, a professional Zoom account. Uh, uh, professional can butter cows where I do the, the podcast art. I'm taking everything into consideration. Mm-hmm. Now I work with an editor, uh, that is not my husband.

Zoe:

That's your,

Saskia:

well, I, no doubt. But, um, that's obviously a little bit more, uh,

Zoe:

expensive editing.

Saskia:

Sorry. That's true. That's true. You do your own editing. I'm sorry about that. Um, and I can do that too. It's a choice. I know that, but that's the, the value, let's say that's the general value of an episode, whether you have somebody Yeah. Do that for you or you spend your hours, which are valuable as well. Sure. Doing it. So that's one episode, 10 hours, a hundred euros, and, uh, I'm certified to do that. It's, it's this horrible, I mean, it's not horrible and that's not what I'm saying. Again, it's nerding. No, again, it's. It's eyeopening. Mm-hmm. That was, it's definitely not horrible because we have a job. We do our job, we try to do it well. Yeah. The more income we get, if it's for Patreon or for something else, we can do a better job that's simple as it is and we can

Zoe:

sustain ourselves.

Saskia:

Exactly. And our business. Yeah. And our both. So it's, it's. We are offering all of this information and inspiration for free, but it's not free to produce or to make. And so I've been thinking, how do I feel about this? How am I, how am I getting to the point where it feels, uh, ballast at? And um, so I would never share or I would never sell something that I don't personally use or believe in. Um, I feel exactly the same way as you do about, uh, advertising more materials, more yarns, more of everything. But if I would, I would say I would push the businesses that make better decisions forward. I think that's a great idea, um, to, to sustain those kinds of businesses. So there's different, there's different ways of coming at it and. Uh, I pay for the podcasts with, uh, the memberships of my community. and that's how I do it. So what I'm now focusing on is my podcast is there. To help and support business owners for free. Mm-hmm. And it will give almost the same information or a lot of the same information that I offer in my, uh, program. The, uh, business circle, the difference is in the circle you have Memento and you have community and accountability, and that's basically what you pay for. And that is actually what will really. Get you to do the work, but if you had me hiding, no, there's no hiding. And, and we all know how that works, but if you do, if you can't afford it, you will. The idea is that the podcast will get you a long, long way. So my podcast serves the purpose of promoting my program, and that is the ads shattered value for me. So that's what I'm looking at. And then I will, I will mention, uh, like flow desk that I use for emailing because I think it's a, a great business. It's it's female owned. It's very inclusive. It is exactly what businesses like us need. So here we go. And it is if natural, I don't even have to try it. But, um, I will provoke those kinds of things and offer, uh, an affiliate link. I'd be clear about it.

Zoe:

I'll, I'll say you. Yeah. You're very transparent about it.

Saskia:

Yeah. Yeah. So that, I think for me, that, that be

Zoe:

a way that's also, that is also helping your Yes, exactly. Because they are in a position to need a mail service. Yes. And,

Saskia:

and, uh, and or, uh, a website or a page or, uh, uh, one single page where they could start sending things. And, uh, with a promotional code that can get you 50% of, for your first years, that could be the boost that you need. Uh, and that, yeah, it, it works that way. Yeah, I think so.

Zoe:

Yeah. Yeah, it makes a lot of sense. I can't wait to see how the evolution goes.

Saskia:

Yeah. Same for me because I, I really wanna know how, uh, your extra bits and bulbs evolved. Yeah. Well it's,

Zoe:

it's all, let's see what happens. It,

Saskia:

it's gi making. We'll, we'll keep you

Zoe:

guys posted Saturday. Um, um, well, we are gonna go and have some pizza. We are, we are

Saskia:

pizza party. So you've heard it. I'm going to change the title of the podcast and the approach a little bit. And you know what the new name is at the end of the episode. And I'll keep you in suspense just a little bit longer. Thanks to all this nerves that were kind enough to spend 10 minutes or maybe 15 with my questionnaire, so that I could learn about your thoughts and ideas for the podcast. Basically all listeners love the podcast as is, but maybe with a little bit of a shorter intro and episodes between 30 and 45 minutes. Most people have learned about the podcast through my email and via guests sharing on their social media. As I'm not on social media. I love to take this opportunity to ask you to pick any episode you liked and shared with a friend whom you might think finds value in it. Without social media, old fashioned word of mouth is the way to go. Most people listen, as soon as it drops or they binge a few episodes at a time. It's so reassuring for me to know that it's not a problem to come out with a new episode every other week, instead of weekly, this makes it manageable for me. And one of the things I teach is to adjust your work to what you can do in your life. So I better practice what I preach. Right. People don't like ads before the episode begins. They don't like them at all. One in the middle is okay. And at the end is fine too. So I'll be taking that into account for sure. I'll also be working on the readability of the cover arts and the music is going to stay the same for now. It's fun. It's friendly and it's different from most. I tried mailing one of my favorite record labels to ask them for sound snippets, but LS, they didn't reply. It was fun. Mailing them though, and a little bit scary, but I liked doing those kinds of things. You never know. So, thank you very much. Shall be Julie Kim, Zoe Monica, Vanessa Allen collect gross EST Galena. Mandy Wilma. God. Laney. That's affluent. Barbara Kathleen. And Maricka. I hope you will all like the new name. And two of you will get a present and I've already mailed you. So you know who you are. So drum roll, please. The new name is going to be pattern shift. Supporting value driven businesses in needle crafts. So Until the next one and make your stitches counts.